Frequently Asked Questions

  • HOW DO YOU CLEAN A CAULDRON?

    We aren’t sure why this question gets asked so frequently. The good news is that you don’t need to clean a Cauldron very often, because they like a layer of ash in the bottom. The better news is that it couldn’t be easier to do. Just step on one edge of the basin and sweep out the ash — Presto! Another task completed. Get yourself a beer – you deserve it.

  • ARE THERE HOLES IN THE BOTTOM?

    None. No holes. No holes at all. And for very good reasons, too. Believe us, we’ve thought this through. First, you don’t want sparks falling out the bottom. This would be NFG. Second, you also don’t want ash water dripping out on your patio. Most importantly, when you want to put the fire underneath the basin and break the state crawdad boil record, the basin must hold water. We sell covers to keep rain and snow out. Please buy one with your initial purchase. If you don’t, you’ll wish you had, and we will have to charge you extra for shipping to send you one separately.

  • WHAT ABOUT AIR FLOW?

    Cowboy Cauldrons are designed to burn wood perfectly, just the way they are. The reasons get very technical, and we’ll skip the physics lesson. Just know that the fire goes right in the bottom of the basin, and heat is concentrated in such a way that combustion is very complete. We provide a charcoal grate for times when you might want to use it charcoal cooking, but for fires or cooking with fire, just load, light, and laugh.

  • ARE THEY HARD TO PUT TOGETHER?

    The first time you put a Cauldron together it may take you a while because you have to get it out of the box, and we package our stuff really well. It takes no tools to put one together or take one apart, and with two people involved, once you have it all unwrapped you should have it ready to go in a couple of minutes, tops.  Seriously, they are so easy to assemble that if you and a friend can’t put one together the third time in under 90 seconds or so, you probably shouldn’t own one. It would be an indication of much larger problems.